Enermax Galaxy 850W

Written by Mike Mackenzie    Friday, 19 October 2007 13:51
Article Index
Enermax Galaxy 850W
Unpacking, Specs, and Features
Closer Look
Installation
Testing and Results
Conclusion
All Pages

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Power supplies are becoming one of the most critical components in the computer system. With the next generation of hardware requiring increasingly more power, the need for more efficient, higher wattage power supplies with additional 12v rails has increased. High end quad core processors will require dual twelve volt rails to ensure stability. High end motherboards with dual PCI-Express graphics cards will more than likely require their own rails and additional rails for peripherals.

Enermax has been producing power supplies for over 15 years, and have been leaders in development of power supplies. Most recently they were the first to produce a power supply with five 12 volt rails, and The Galaxy was the first PSU to be compliant with the 2007 EPS12V design standard. With innovations and future compatibility, why wouldn’t you want an Enermax power supply?

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Package Contents

           Enermax Galaxy 850W Power supply

            Accessory Box

            2 Case badges (white and black)

            Mounting Hardware

            4 3x SATA cables

            2 3x Molex Cables

            2 PCI-E cables

            2 2x Molex, 1x floppy cables

            1 +12V cable

 

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Specifications

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EGA850EWL

AC input

100-240VAC, 50-60Hz, 12A max  (Active PFC)

DC output

+3.3V

+5V

+12V1

+12V2

+12V3

+12V4

+12V5

-12V

+5Vsb

For CPU

For GPU/System/Drives

30A

30A

17A

17A

17A

17A

17A

0.6A

6A

200W

408W (34A)

408W(34A)

7.2W

30W

Total Power

850W

Peak Power

950W

 

Features

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- 850 WATTs

  CONTINUOUS POWER for ULTRA SYSTEMS.

- 816 WATTs

  2V COMBINED POWER for ULTRA CPU’s and GRAPHICS.

- 24/7 @ 50°C

  NON-STOP FULL POWER @ 50°C by design and components.

- 2007 EPS12V SSI COMPLIANT

  WORLD’s FIRST PSU compliant with upcoming 2007 EPS12V SSI design guide revision.

- WORLD’s FIRST FIVE 12V rails

  2007 EPS12V SSI specification for next-generation systems.

- WORLD’s STRONGEST +5Vsb output of 6A

 2007 EPS12V SSI specification for next-generation systems and multiple USB devices.

- TRIPLE QUAD + 24

  QUAD CPU,

  QUAD CORE,QUAD GRAPHICS,

  24DRIVES.

  SIMULTANEOUS!

- 80-85% EFFICIENCY

  @ 20-100% load for the SMALLEST electricity BILLS

- MODULAR connectors

  MAXIMUM SATA or IDE/SCSI drives (21+3 of free choice).

- SILENT & COOL

  by 13.5 & 8cm dual fans.

- POWER GUARD

  4 ALERT MODES on PSU STATUS with RESET button.

- TRIPLE TRANSFORMER TECHNOLOGY

  the UTMOST in STABILITY & POWER.

- DUAL TIER MINIMUM LOAD design

  OUTSTANDING COMPATIBILITY with upcoming multi-core processors.

- DUAL TIER COMBINED POWER

  TOTAL SEPARATION of CPU(s) from the rest of your SYSTEM for maximum stability.

- RAM POWER CABLE

  WORLD’s FIRST PSU with a dedicated RAM power cable to support next-generation 32-64GB RAM systems.

- ACTIVE PFC & UNIVERSAL AC IN run your GALAXY from 90-264VAC with automatic adjustment and active power factor correction.



A Closer Look at the Enermax Galaxy

            One thing is certain, the specifications look great on the Galaxy, but I was interested in exactly how the Galaxy looked.

First thing I had noticed when I opened up the Galaxy was everything was boxed up separately. There is a large box which contains just the power supply unit that is larger than most power supply boxes on its own. There is an additional box, slightly smaller and much lighter, labeled accessory box. It contains several beautifully wrapped modular power leads, case badges, a lanyard, mounting hardware, and the instruction manual.

 

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What makes the Galaxy so special though? The internal parts are where the Galaxy shines. First is the cooling. The Galaxy is cooled by a giant 135mm fan. The fan pulls air out of the chassis and through the PSU directly over the heatsinks. Enermax didn’t skimp out on the heatsinks either. They are massive enough to ensure system stability and performance in temperatures upward of 50C. The heat within the power supply is exhausted out of the case with the aid of a single 80mm fan.

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The untrained eye might not notice a few components in the Galaxy PSU such as the triple transformers. Most high end power supplies only use one and very few use two. The Galaxy dedicates one transformer to the 12v rail for the processor and dedicates the rest of the rails for the other components in the system. This provides the ultimate solution for stability of the triple quad, quad CPU, quad SLI, and quad graphics. As well as provide power for 24 peripherals.


 

Installation of the Galaxy

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            One thing is certain; the Galaxy is a long power supply. Clearance may be an issue in some cases. At first I was going to install the Galaxy in one of my smallest chassis and quickly realized it wasn’t going to happen. Standard ATX cases with front doors or stealth drives may be an issue. Any case that with drives installed further back into the chassis may cause issues also. After that I decided to install the Galaxy into my new Cooler Master iTower 930. Cooler Master designed their chassis with a power supply support bracket which encloses the PSU. I had to remove this bracket in order to install the Galaxy. Finally, I received an Enermax Phoenix chassis that can hold the Galaxy easily.

 

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            The act of installing the PSU is very simple depending on how your case is arranged. Lay out the power supply, and decide if any modular cables will be necessary for installation. Connecting these ahead of time can help save you from having to squeeze your hands into the cramped up space between PSU and drives. Using the provided hardware, mount the power supply in position, and attach the necessary power leads to the components.

 

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The Galaxy offers very long, sleeved power leads. Unfortunately, not all cables are fully sleeved. Good cable management is a must since it is quite easy for the huge bundle of cables to make a mess inside the case.



Testing the Galaxy

            My system cannot max out the Galaxy. Add up a Kentsfield quad-core processor (around $1500 at time of review), a quad SLI setup with two 7950GX2’s ($500 a piece at time of review), and 24 hard drives (about $100 each). The total comes to around $4900 which you can power 24/7 at an internal 50C temperature with the Galaxy. If you ask me, this monster power supply is remarkable.

 

So with my components let’s see how the Galaxy turns out. The Galaxy is more than likely powerful enough for me to attach every single drive in my apartment and still provide excellent stability of the rails, I would have done so, but in all reality there is no need as I can’t put a load on all those drives and they would sit idle. If I had a means of running a RAID with at least 4 of the drive then I would give it a shot.

 

Test Bed

            Intel Core2Duo E6300 @ 2.345 GHz (7 x 335 MHz 1.2v)

            2GB (2x1024MB) Crucial Ballistix Tracer 55512 1:1

            Cooler Master Eclipse Cooler

            DFI Infinity 975X @ 335 MHz FSB

            Sapphire X800 GTO 2 @ 615/650

            Hitachi Deskstar SATA2

            BenQ DVD+RW drive

            Antec HDD Cooler & temp probe

 

Results

            Once I loaded up Battlefield 2142 and hooked up my digital multimeter to the power leads on the motherboard and an exposed SATA connector, I was able to give the Galaxy a run under some intense gaming action. This will give me readings from the 12v lines on the CPU, as well as 12v, 5v, and 3.3v rails for the peripherals.

 

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With my test bed there was an extremely minimal voltage drop at load, and was still above specs which show the Galaxy is a powerhouse of a power supply. Such a minimal drop from highly overclocked hardware certainly leaves a lot of headroom for higher end components which consume even more power.

 

Conclusion

            It is safe to say that the Galaxy is an amazing PSU. The only thing that would prevent a customer from purchasing is the cost. Although, if a user is purchasing quad core processors and quad SLI graphics card then the Galaxy should be very affordable. It is much more affordable than some other powersupplies with the same specs and features, which only makes the Galaxy even better value. If you are interested in purchasing the Galaxy, just make sure it fits in your case before you order. No one wants to get a shiny new power supply and not be able to fit it in their case when they open the box.

           

Pros and Cons

Pros: 

  • Unbelievable Stability, minimal voltage drop at load
  • Amazing reliability 850W 24/7 with internal temperatures of 50C
  • Compatibility for the next generation of hardware
  • Native and Modular design, the best of both worlds
  • Cable Accessory case to hold unused power leads
  • Packed full of features which provide ultimate solutions for users in need of reliable power
  • 135mm fan is directly above the processor, great for ventilation from large passive coolers such as the Scythe Ninja, or Thermalright HR-01.
  • Very quiet considering dual fans, as well as a 135mm fan, gets louder with load.

Cons: 

  • Expensive and excessive for most users
  • Large size may cause compatibility issues with smaller chassis.
  • Entire power lead is not sleeved, only to first power connector.
  • Power guard beeping can get annoying late at night.

 

On behalf of InsaneTek, I would like to thank Enermax for sending us the Galaxy 850W power supply to review. It certainly offers the best value for ultra high end systems and is great for any die hard overclocker looking to provide the best power signal to their components. It blew me away and made me start looking to purchase new hardware so I can maximize the potential of this power supply unit.

If you have any questions or comments, feel free to hit us up in the forums. You can also check out more of our latest reviews on the front page