Enermax Liberty EL500AWT 500W - Page 7

Written by John Chen    Tuesday, 08 November 2005 11:00
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Testing Setup and Results

Test Setup and Method:

  • Intel Pentium D 840
  • Asus P5WD2 Premium
  • ATI Radeon X800XT
  • 2 x 512MB OCZ Platinum PC2-8000
  • Hitachi 80GB SATA
  • Sony DVD-Rom
  • Floppy drive
  • 120mm Evercool
  • DLink 802.11b wireless NIC

Running Stock:

  • Intel Pentium D 840 3.2GHz -- 16 x 200FSB = 3.2GHz @ 1.4v
  • 2 x 512MB OCZ Platinum PC2-8000 -- 200FSB 3:4 266MHz @ 2.0v
  • ATI Radeon X800XT -- 500/500
  • FSB Termination Voltage -- 1.2v
  • ICH Chipset Voltage -- 1.05v
  • MCH Chipset Voltage -- 1.5v

Running Overclocked:

  • Intel Pentium D 840 3.2GHz -- 16 x 250FSB = 4.0GHz @ 1.4v
  • 2 x 512MB OCZ Platinum PC2-8000 -- 250FSB 1:2 500MHz @ 2.3v
  • ATI Radeon X800XT -- 540/540
  • FSB Termination Voltage -- 1.5v
  • ICH Chipset Voltage -- 1.2v
  • MCH Chipset Voltage -- 1.65v

Testing the power supply is a tedious task.  Like cooling products, the "proper" testing method is long and strenuous.  It involves high end equipment and testing materials that we simply cannot get our hands on.  A simple proper testing method would be to test the wattage draw from the AC outlet, voltage rail fluctuations, wattage fluctuations under high operating temperatures, power efficiency, and the power supply's reaction to low input voltage.  But because this site is dedicated more to overclocking, we'll check for voltage fluctuations in an overclocked environment.  After all, that is what overclockers generally care about.

Results:

To test the power supply, a digital multimeter was used.  For idle voltage readings, the system was left on the desktop not running any programs.  For full load, the system ran 2 instances of CPU Burn-in, Prime95 torture test for maximum power consumption, PCMark2004 hard drive benchmark, and the Nature test in 3DMark2001SE.  CPU Burn-in is a good program to maximize the CPU load.  The Liberty 500W did not even break a sweat!



 

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